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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile

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World Wildlife Fund

Our planet faces many big conservation challenges. No one person or organization can tackle these challenges alone, but together we can.

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List of latest photos taken by World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife.

Current medias from @world_wildlife. Feel free to comment, like and share them

World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Today is #EndangeredSpeciesDay and the most endangered marine mammal in the world needs your help. So far, more than 78,000 of you have signed on to demand immediate action to protect the vaquita. Haven’t signed yet? Click the link in our bio and add your name now! 1518236229283862528_438789758

Today is #endangeredspeciesdayand the most endangered marine mammal in the world needs your help. So far, more than 78,000 of you have signed on to demand immediate action to protect the vaquita. Haven’t signed yet? Click the link in our bio and add your name now!

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram In what has become the new normal over the past 10 years, residents of the Inupiat village of Point Lay on the coast of the Chukchi Sea in Alaska have had new neighbors each fall. Tens of thousands of walrus, primarily females and calves, have gathered on beaches near the village. “In 2009, there were 50,000 animals at Point Lay,” remembers US Fish and Wildlife biologist Joel Garlich-Miller. “The haulout expanded for several miles along the beach.” 1511735909040865737_438789758

In what has become the new normal over the past 10 years, residents of the Inupiat village of Point Lay on the coast of the Chukchi Sea in Alaska have had new neighbors each fall. Tens of thousands of walrus, primarily females and calves, have gathered on beaches near the village. “In 2009, there were 50,000 animals at Point Lay,” remembers US Fish and Wildlife biologist Joel Garlich-Miller. “The haulout expanded for several miles along the beach.”

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram The smallest member of the porpoise family is the most endangered marine mammal in the world. Unsustainable and illegal fishing practices have caused a dramatic decline on the vaquita's population. With fewer than 30 vaquita left in the wild, without immediate action they face imminent extinction.

Stand with us, and let President Peña Nieto of Mexico know that we demand action to protect the vaquita today. Link in bio. 1511009516422346390_438789758

The smallest member of the porpoise family is the most endangered marine mammal in the world. Unsustainable and illegal fishing practices have caused a dramatic decline on the vaquita's population. With fewer than 30 vaquita left in the wild, without immediate action they face imminent extinction. Stand with us, and let President Peña Nieto of Mexico know that we demand action to protect the vaquita today. Link in bio.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram This week, President Trump said he will soon be making a decision on whether to stay in the Paris Climate Accord – an international agreement nearly every nation on Earth joined to curb climate change. 106,529 people have signed our letter to President Trump telling him we can’t back away from progress. Will you join us in standing up for what’s right? Click the link in our bio to take action now. 1508062174673044775_438789758

This week, President Trump said he will soon be making a decision on whether to stay in the Paris Climate Accord – an international agreement nearly every nation on Earth joined to curb climate change. 106,529 people have signed our letter to President Trump telling him we can’t back away from progress. Will you join us in standing up for what’s right? Click the link in our bio to take action now.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram 200,000 people flooded the streets of D.C. for the People's Climate March. To the activists who marched with us or participated in other ways: Thank you! #climatemarch #peoplesclimate 1506663261948829435_438789758

200,000 people flooded the streets of D.C. for the People's Climate March. To the activists who marched with us or participated in other ways: Thank you! #climatemarch #peoplesclimate

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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram March with us! #PeoplesClimate #ClimateMarch 1503840762307523058_438789758

March with us! #peoplesclimate #climatemarch

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram We’re at the #PeoplesClimate March! Together, we can tackle the climate challenge and accelerate the clean energy future. #climatemarch 1503768622618946633_438789758

We’re at the #peoplesclimateMarch! Together, we can tackle the climate challenge and accelerate the clean energy future. #climatemarch

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram ​Today we march for clean energy and to demand a safer future. Cutting carbon pollution and investing in clean energy isn’t only good for our environment—it means safer communities and more American jobs. Already, 3.3 million Americans have jobs because of the clean energy revolution—that’s more than all US jobs from fossil fuel industries combined. #ClimateMarch #PeoplesClimate 1503697004366538333_438789758

​Today we march for clean energy and to demand a safer future. Cutting carbon pollution and investing in clean energy isn’t only good for our environment—it means safer communities and more American jobs. Already, 3.3 million Americans have jobs because of the clean energy revolution—that’s more than all US jobs from fossil fuel industries combined. #climatemarch #peoplesclimate

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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram What do giant pandas and a stick of butter have in common? Believe it or not, a newborn panda and a stick of butter are around the same size! @Disneynature’s #BornInChina follows three animal families—the elusive snow leopard, the clever monkey, and the majestic panda—as they struggle to survive over the course of a year while embracing the challenge of raising their families. 1501640622778738216_438789758

What do giant pandas and a stick of butter have in common? Believe it or not, a newborn panda and a stick of butter are around the same size! @Disneynature’s #borninchinafollows three animal families—the elusive snow leopard, the clever monkey, and the majestic panda—as they struggle to survive over the course of a year while embracing the challenge of raising their families.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Celebrate #EarthDay2017! A reminder that many animals on our planet need help. Spread awareness and code your own message to support endangered species. @madewithcode Link in bio. 1498710900529918908_438789758

Celebrate #EarthDay2017! A reminder that many animals on our planet need help. Spread awareness and code your own message to support endangered species. @madewithcode Link in bio.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Make every day #EarthDay! 1498658225532489050_438789758

Make every day #EarthDay!

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Happy #EarthDay! In @Disneynature's #BornInChina, moviegoers get to see snow leopards up close. How much do you know about this elusive and iconic animal? Follow the link in our bio and brush up on your knowledge. 1498586155796777810_438789758

Happy #EarthDay! In @Disneynature's #BornInChina, moviegoers get to see snow leopards up close. How much do you know about this elusive and iconic animal? Follow the link in our bio and brush up on your knowledge.

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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Have you seen today’s #GoogleDoodle? Check it out and find out how you can take action for the planet this Earth Day. 1498114171757589460_438789758

Have you seen today’s #GoogleDoodle? Check it out and find out how you can take action for the planet this Earth Day.

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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Starting today, moviegoers who see #BornInChina in U.S. theaters opening week (April 21-27) will help support WWF’s conservation work in the region. For every ticket sold opening week across North America, @Disneynature will make a donation to WWF. Follow the link in our bio to learn more. 1497985041124816219_438789758

Starting today, moviegoers who see #borninchinain U.S. theaters opening week (April 21-27) will help support WWF’s conservation work in the region. For every ticket sold opening week across North America, @Disneynature will make a donation to WWF. Follow the link in our bio to learn more.

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World Wildlife Fund @world_wildlife Instagram Profile Photo World Wildlife Fund

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram A new report by WWF reveals that World Heritage sites are especially vulnerable to illegal harvesting of species listed by CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), including tigers and African elephants. The global wild tiger population has increased in recent years, but in some areas they are still being killed at an unsustainable rate. The Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra is home to a number of endangered species, including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger. Illegal harvesting and industrialization are so prevalent, that the site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 2011. Poaching of Sumatran tigers is driven by demand in countries such as China, Vietnam and Malaysia, where almost every part of the tiger is used for traditional medicines, delicacies and decorations.Tigers aren’t the only species being targeted within their World Heritage site homes. The African elephant population has declined by 111,000 in the last decade due in large part to poaching. Selous Game Reserve, recognized as a World Heritage site in 1982 and one of the largest animal reserves in the world, has lost almost 90% of its elephants since its inscription in 1982. In response to these new findings, the report calls for protection and monitoring at World Heritage sites to be accompanied by broader action to curb demand for illegal wildlife and wildlife products. Unless NGOs, governments, the UN system and civil society take measures to halt illegal harvesting in World Heritage sites, some species could face local extinction. #worldheritageday 1495902021504968580_438789758

A new report by WWF reveals that World Heritage sites are especially vulnerable to illegal harvesting of species listed by CITES (the Convention on International Trade in Endangered Species), including tigers and African elephants. The global wild tiger population has increased in recent years, but in some areas they are still being killed at an unsustainable rate. The Tropical Rainforest Heritage of Sumatra is home to a number of endangered species, including the critically endangered Sumatran tiger. Illegal harvesting and industrialization are so prevalent, that the site was inscribed on the List of World Heritage in Danger in 2011. Poaching of Sumatran tigers is driven by demand in countries such as China, Vietnam and Malaysia, where almost every part of the tiger is used for traditional medicines, delicacies and decorations.Tigers aren’t the only species being targeted within their World Heritage site homes. The African elephant population has declined by 111,000 in the last decade due in large part to poaching. Selous Game Reserve, recognized as a World Heritage site in 1982 and one of the largest animal reserves in the world, has lost almost 90% of its elephants since its inscription in 1982. In response to these new findings, the report calls for protection and monitoring at World Heritage sites to be accompanied by broader action to curb demand for illegal wildlife and wildlife products. Unless NGOs, governments, the UN system and civil society take measures to halt illegal harvesting in World Heritage sites, some species could face local extinction. #worldheritageday

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Yep. You’re currently experiencing the ocean from a whale’s perspective.

With the help of WWF, scientists are using non-invasive digital tags with suction cups to monitor the behavior and movements of whales. The tags remain on the whales for 24 to 48 hours before being taken off and reused. Whale tags have allowed scientists to discover where, when and how they are feeding in the Antarctic Peninsula, to learn about their social lives, and to gain information on the impact of shrinking ice caused by warming sea temperatures. With this information, we can make recommendations for where to create Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and promote education to encourage the conservation and protection of whales in Antarctica.​ 1492915089099403834_438789758

Yep. You’re currently experiencing the ocean from a whale’s perspective. With the help of WWF, scientists are using non-invasive digital tags with suction cups to monitor the behavior and movements of whales. The tags remain on the whales for 24 to 48 hours before being taken off and reused. Whale tags have allowed scientists to discover where, when and how they are feeding in the Antarctic Peninsula, to learn about their social lives, and to gain information on the impact of shrinking ice caused by warming sea temperatures. With this information, we can make recommendations for where to create Marine Protected Areas (MPAs) and promote education to encourage the conservation and protection of whales in Antarctica.​

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Do you know what a pangolin is? Though many think of them as reptiles, pangolins are actually mammals. They are the only mammals wholly-covered in scales and they use those scales to protect themselves from predators in the wild. If under threat, a pangolin will immediately curl into a tight ball and will use their sharp-scaled tails to defend themselves. They are one of the most trafficked mammals in Asia and, increasingly, Africa. That’s why WWF, together with TRAFFIC, works to protect the species from wildlife crime. 1492079558803243651_438789758

Do you know what a pangolin is? Though many think of them as reptiles, pangolins are actually mammals. They are the only mammals wholly-covered in scales and they use those scales to protect themselves from predators in the wild. If under threat, a pangolin will immediately curl into a tight ball and will use their sharp-scaled tails to defend themselves. They are one of the most trafficked mammals in Asia and, increasingly, Africa. That’s why WWF, together with TRAFFIC, works to protect the species from wildlife crime.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram As their name implies, mountain gorillas live in forests high in the mountains, at elevations of 8,000 to 13,000 feet. They have thicker fur, and more of it, compared to other great apes. The fur helps them to survive in a habitat where temperatures often drop below freezing. 1490815453458969493_438789758

As their name implies, mountain gorillas live in forests high in the mountains, at elevations of 8,000 to 13,000 feet. They have thicker fur, and more of it, compared to other great apes. The fur helps them to survive in a habitat where temperatures often drop below freezing.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram Snow leopards are solitary and elusive creatures. Since it’s so rare to see two snow leopards together, there is actually no term for a group of snow leopards. In the upcoming @Disneynature movie, #BornInChina, snow leopards are viewed in the wild like never before. Learn more about snow leopards by following the link in our bio. 1490262371939460184_438789758

Snow leopards are solitary and elusive creatures. Since it’s so rare to see two snow leopards together, there is actually no term for a group of snow leopards. In the upcoming @Disneynature movie, #BornInChina, snow leopards are viewed in the wild like never before. Learn more about snow leopards by following the link in our bio.

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Check world_wildlife's Instagram When most Americans picture the lobster, they often think of claws. But the spiny lobster doesn’t actually have any; instead, all 10 of its legs taper to points. What it lacks in pinching power, however, it makes up for in alien beauty. This species, which can grow up to two feet long, is bedecked with splotches of purple and orange, salted with white spots along its tail, and abristle with spikes upon its carapace. This is one psychedelic crustacean. Photo by @macstonephoto 1490005561936578747_438789758

When most Americans picture the lobster, they often think of claws. But the spiny lobster doesn’t actually have any; instead, all 10 of its legs taper to points. What it lacks in pinching power, however, it makes up for in alien beauty. This species, which can grow up to two feet long, is bedecked with splotches of purple and orange, salted with white spots along its tail, and abristle with spikes upon its carapace. This is one psychedelic crustacean. Photo by @macstonephoto

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