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Sally Warring (@pondlife_pondlife) Instagram Profile Photo

pondlife_pondlife

Sally Warring

🔬🎥 Documenting the single cellular life of New York City (and occasionally beyond), one pond at a time. Profile image by @raminrahni 💚🦠

http://pondlifepondlife.com/

Sally Warring (@pondlife_pondlife) Instagram photos and videos

List of Instagram medias taken by Sally Warring (@pondlife_pondlife)

Echo Park Lake

A ciliate casually sifting through diatoms, trying each one out for size. Does it really need another? Can one have too many diatoms? Life’s big questions are being asked. Right here, right now. . . . . . .

Echo Lake Park

Three little stars from LA. Diatoms called Cymbella. That one in the middle is dead and leaves behind its beautiful glass shell to be inherited by the sediment layer. . . . . . .

Echo Park Lake

LA is full of recognizable faces, but who is this? I don’t know. Looks kinda like a Heliozoan, but what’s up with all those flagella like things? Are they cilia? Is it a ciliate? Do you know? . . . . . . . .

Los Angeles, California

A few weeks ago I was in LA for a friend’s wedding and took a walk around the inimitable Echo Park Lake. Lucky I always keep one of these tubes in my handbag, which are also within the volume limit for carry on luggage! Wins all round. . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

Today’s creature feature is the infamous tardigrade. A tiny eight legged animal sometimes called a moss piglet. 🔉Sound on to hear some details about the tardigrade! . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . Transcript: This tiny critter is a common resident of mossy soils where it up food through a tubular mouth. Each Tardigrade possess four pairs of stubby complete with tiny claws. Though not exactly graceful, these and claws do help the tardigrade to move through its microscopic jungle home. Moss provides a habitat rich in food for these microscopic animals, all of which feed on bacteria or small microbes or moss cells. In return their feeding activity contributes to the nutrient cycles in this soil, adding to the breakdown of large organic molecules into smaller ones that can be reused by the moss and the wider community. . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

Nematodes are some of the most numerous animals on earth, but very few have their own personalized sound effects. This one does. 🔉Sound on to hear @raminrahni’s nematode noises! . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . Transcript: This is a nematode, a microscopic worm living here in the soil. Nematodes are some of the most numerous animals on Earth, thousands can exist in a single handful of soil. . . . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

The rotifers from Pondlife episode three. These tiny multicellular animals are found all over the world and all through the moss. 🔉Sound on to hear a little about these crafty critters! . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . Transcript: Not all microbes are single cellular, some are tiny multicellular animals and just us like they come complete with a complex digestive system including a mouth, stomach and intestines. They even have small brains and simple nervous systems. This animal is a rotifer. Rotifers have a single foot at one end that helps with movement and attachment to surfaces. At the other end a crown of cilia funnels water and particles through the mouth and mastax. The mastax is a simple pharynx that moves the incoming particles through to the stomach. . . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

We found so many different types of ciliates living inside a tiny patch of moss. This is a selection of some of the different ciliates we saw. These organisms are really important members of soil communities. 🔉Sound on to hear @michael_tessler and I talking about these microbes! . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . Transcript: MT: Is that a ciliate? . SW: That is a ciliate, yeah… . MT: Oh, very cool. . SW: ...a tiny wee one. . Ciliates are single celled predators that live by eating bacteria and other small microbes in the soil, this way contributing to the nutrient cycle. The diversity of ciliates we can find in this one patch of moss is astounding. Long ones, round ones, red ones and even green ones packed full of symbiotic algae. . . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

In Pondlife episode three we take a close look at moss and the microbes that live among them. Have you ever taken a look at moss under a microscope? Moss leaves are only one cell thick, making it nice and easy to view the individual cells. Thanks to @michael_tessler for joining me in this episode! . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . Transcript: MT: Oh yeah that’s awesome you can see the leaf cells that’s cool. . SW: Yeah. . MT: So this is the leaf and this is the leaf tip and you can see it’s kind of see through all the cells they don’t have chlorophyll in there. . SW: Under the microscope we can see just how thin a moss leaf is. Each consists of only a single layer of cells. These thin leaves can absorb water and nutrients directly from their surroundings, rather than having to transport water and nutrients from the soil through roots and shoots like larger plants. For these rock dwelling species, this means they can soak up rain water and even morning dew directly from the rock. . . . . . . .

Mohonk Preserve

Pondlife episode three - Searching for Microbes in Moss - is now available for your viewing pleasure! This one is a special episode as it features my friend and collaborator @michael_tessler. The two of us go together into the field to search out microbes living in and around moss. Tardigrades included. . 🔬🎥 Full video link in my bio 🦠💚. . . . . . . .

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