ImgwondersImgwonders

Instagram Online Web Viewer

en

@99217 Instagram Profile

 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Your page for astronomy, nature & news✌🏻 Always have an open mind Kauai, Hawaii 🌴

List of latest photos taken by @99217.

Current medias from @99217. Feel free to comment, like and share them

 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Beautiful day down by the sea 🙏🏼 1459062052726751842_2523622912

Beautiful day down by the sea 🙏🏼

Share 6 47

Advertisement

 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Yesterday's view of our neighboring island Niihau. 1458907769288900498_2523622912

Yesterday's view of our neighboring island Niihau.

Share 2 33

Advertisement

 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Don't forget to mark it on your Calendars 🙌🏻 1457015879035753080_2523622912

Don't forget to mark it on your Calendars 🙌🏻

Share 3 67

Advertisement

 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Always stay connected to nature, blessed to call this place home ✌🏻 1456696542630421220_2523622912

Always stay connected to nature, blessed to call this place home ✌🏻

Share 1 51
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram This mornings Waning Crescent, taken at 6:29am 02-21-17. 100% visibility this morning. Last night when I was looking at the stars, I noticed what appeared to be a low flying orb right overhead. And flashes of light next to the Pleiades. A lot of activity last night which was very fun to observe. 1455215604545153459_2523622912

This mornings Waning Crescent, taken at 6:29am 02-21-17. 100% visibility this morning. Last night when I was looking at the stars, I noticed what appeared to be a low flying orb right overhead. And flashes of light next to the Pleiades. A lot of activity last night which was very fun to observe.

Share 1 90
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram This mornings waning gibbous, taken at 6:52am. haven't really had a clear morning in a couple of days, hopefully this nice weather keeps up ✌🏻 1452360748448988534_2523622912

This mornings waning gibbous, taken at 6:52am. haven't really had a clear morning in a couple of days, hopefully this nice weather keeps up ✌🏻

Share 2 72
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Managed to catch a shot this morning on my way to work, taken at 6:55am 01-13-17. 1449736509507044874_2523622912

Managed to catch a shot this morning on my way to work, taken at 6:55am 01-13-17.

Share 0 53
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Last nights waning gibbous, taken at 11:04pm 01-12-17. 1449435347407005622_2523622912

Last nights waning gibbous, taken at 11:04pm 01-12-17.

Share 4 45
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Tonight's sunset taken at 6:21pm 01-12-17. 1449110803009892474_2523622912

Tonight's sunset taken at 6:21pm 01-12-17.

Share 1 60
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Tonight's lovely moon, taken at 10:29pm 01-11-17. Visibility was very good tonight, not a cloud in the sky👌🏼 1448462628490254675_2523622912

Tonight's lovely moon, taken at 10:29pm 01-11-17. Visibility was very good tonight, not a cloud in the sky👌🏼

Share 1 88
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Tonight's full moon, taken at 7:03pm 01-10-17. Now as you can see.. I was not so lucky to have clear skies like many people, but I managed to catch this at moonrise, visibility was very poor.. Some people may think of this as a failure 😂 but as long as you go out and are dedicated to something and you try, it is never failure. Sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you don't ✌🏻 1447649918596866019_2523622912

Tonight's full moon, taken at 7:03pm 01-10-17. Now as you can see.. I was not so lucky to have clear skies like many people, but I managed to catch this at moonrise, visibility was very poor.. Some people may think of this as a failure 😂 but as long as you go out and are dedicated to something and you try, it is never failure. Sometimes you get lucky, sometimes you don't ✌🏻

Share 7 71
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Tonight's continued Waxing Gibbous, taken at 7:18pm 01-9-17. Be sure not to miss tomorrow nights full moon and also the eclipse that will be happening! Also don't forget to check out the comet that should be visible after sunset✌🏻 1446933517305227990_2523622912

Tonight's continued Waxing Gibbous, taken at 7:18pm 01-9-17. Be sure not to miss tomorrow nights full moon and also the eclipse that will be happening! Also don't forget to check out the comet that should be visible after sunset✌🏻

Share 6 76
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Feeling very blessed to have @abc7la feature my work ✌🏻 if your not already following them, head over and check em out 1446884374088189587_2523622912

Feeling very blessed to have @abc7la feature my work ✌🏻 if your not already following them, head over and check em out

Share 4 54
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram We’ve never seen anything like that on Earth
That astronomical understatement came from Marc Caffee, professor of physics and astronomy at Purdue University, who was describing the result of a new study which determined Mars once had a massive volcano that erupted continuously for 2 billion of the planet’s 4.5 billion-year history. Ironically, the key to this discovery was found not on Mars but on Earth. There are some 100 meteorites on Earth that have been identified as originating on Mars. According to his study published in the journal Science Advances, Chaffee analyzed 30 of them and was able to sort them by age after determining how long they had been exposed to cosmic rays. Eleven of the meteorites appeared to have been formed by cooling magma from the same volcano and were ejected from the Martian surface by the same event, but one of them was surprisingly much older than the rest … nearly 2 billion years older.
What this means is that for 2 billion years there’s been sort of a steady plume of magma in one location on the surface of Mars. We don’t have anything like that on Earth, where something is that stable for 2 billion years at a specific location.
The largest and best known volcano on Mars is Olympus Mons, which is nearly 17 miles high and would cover all of Arizona or most of France. Until a rover or humans get to Olympus Mons, there’s no way to determine if some of its rocks successfully traveled to Earth, but it’s a possibility. 1446535516049000567_2523622912

We’ve never seen anything like that on Earth That astronomical understatement came from Marc Caffee, professor of physics and astronomy at Purdue University, who was describing the result of a new study which determined Mars once had a massive volcano that erupted continuously for 2 billion of the planet’s 4.5 billion-year history. Ironically, the key to this discovery was found not on Mars but on Earth. There are some 100 meteorites on Earth that have been identified as originating on Mars. According to his study published in the journal Science Advances, Chaffee analyzed 30 of them and was able to sort them by age after determining how long they had been exposed to cosmic rays. Eleven of the meteorites appeared to have been formed by cooling magma from the same volcano and were ejected from the Martian surface by the same event, but one of them was surprisingly much older than the rest … nearly 2 billion years older. What this means is that for 2 billion years there’s been sort of a steady plume of magma in one location on the surface of Mars. We don’t have anything like that on Earth, where something is that stable for 2 billion years at a specific location. The largest and best known volcano on Mars is Olympus Mons, which is nearly 17 miles high and would cover all of Arizona or most of France. Until a rover or humans get to Olympus Mons, there’s no way to determine if some of its rocks successfully traveled to Earth, but it’s a possibility.

Share 2 31
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Tonight's continued Waxing Gibbous, a little cloudy but still managed to get a decent shot. Taken at 8:16pm 01-8-17. 1446212581878792794_2523622912

Tonight's continued Waxing Gibbous, a little cloudy but still managed to get a decent shot. Taken at 8:16pm 01-8-17.

Share 5 84
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Sunrise this morning, taken at 7:17am 01-8-17. 1445882598022021938_2523622912

Sunrise this morning, taken at 7:17am 01-8-17.

Share 2 52
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram While most of the world is watching Washington DC for the next major earth-rattling eruption, someone needs to keep an eye on Iceland, where all four of its major volcanoes are exhibiting signs of potential real eruptions of the global winter kind.
Seismic activity tells us we need to be more vigilant than usual but not much more than that now. She is trying to tell us something more than we may understand not completely.
Geophysicist Páll Einarsson tells Iceland’s Fréttablaðið newspaper (Google translated) that he’s most concerned about Katla, a large volcano in southern Iceland that has had multiple earthquakes in its caldera recently, with one measuring 4.3 magnitude. Katla has a long history of regular eruptions every 60 to 80 years. With its last major eruption in 1918, Katla is overdue. 1445823794761805017_2523622912

While most of the world is watching Washington DC for the next major earth-rattling eruption, someone needs to keep an eye on Iceland, where all four of its major volcanoes are exhibiting signs of potential real eruptions of the global winter kind. Seismic activity tells us we need to be more vigilant than usual but not much more than that now. She is trying to tell us something more than we may understand not completely. Geophysicist Páll Einarsson tells Iceland’s Fréttablaðið newspaper (Google translated) that he’s most concerned about Katla, a large volcano in southern Iceland that has had multiple earthquakes in its caldera recently, with one measuring 4.3 magnitude. Katla has a long history of regular eruptions every 60 to 80 years. With its last major eruption in 1918, Katla is overdue.

Share 6 44
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Taken this evening at 6:35pm.  Tonight’s waxing gibbous moon – February 7, 2017 – shines inside a large asterism that we in the Northern Hemisphere often call the Winter Circle. It’s an incredibly large star configuration made of brilliant winter stars. Around the world on this night, the moon is inside the Circle. From anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere, look for the Winter Circle to fill up much of the eastern half of sky at nightfall. By mid-evening, the Winter Circle will swing to your southern sky, and then it will drift into the western sky around midnight. If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere … although it’s not winter for you, these same stars appear near the moon.

The Winter Circle – sometimes called the Winter Hexagon – is not one of the 88 recognized constellations. Rather, it’s an asterism – a pattern of stars that’s fairly easy to recognize. Our sky chart cannot adequately convey the Winter Circle’s humongous size! It dwarfs the constellation Orion the Hunter, which is a rather large constellation, occupying the southwestern part of the Winter Circle pattern. 1445436044451530644_2523622912

Taken this evening at 6:35pm. Tonight’s waxing gibbous moon – February 7, 2017 – shines inside a large asterism that we in the Northern Hemisphere often call the Winter Circle. It’s an incredibly large star configuration made of brilliant winter stars. Around the world on this night, the moon is inside the Circle. From anywhere in the Northern Hemisphere, look for the Winter Circle to fill up much of the eastern half of sky at nightfall. By mid-evening, the Winter Circle will swing to your southern sky, and then it will drift into the western sky around midnight. If you’re in the Southern Hemisphere … although it’s not winter for you, these same stars appear near the moon. The Winter Circle – sometimes called the Winter Hexagon – is not one of the 88 recognized constellations. Rather, it’s an asterism – a pattern of stars that’s fairly easy to recognize. Our sky chart cannot adequately convey the Winter Circle’s humongous size! It dwarfs the constellation Orion the Hunter, which is a rather large constellation, occupying the southwestern part of the Winter Circle pattern.

Share 5 74
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Those words were written by a team of astronomers from Keio University in Japan to describe a strange, super fast cloud of molecules currently speeding through the Milky Way against the direction of the spin of our galaxy. The cloud measures over two light-years in size and is hurtling through the galaxy at speeds never observed in similar clouds of space dust. The cloud, nicknamed “the Bullet,” is traveling at speeds approaching 75 miles per second (120 km/s). The cloud is also stretching as it flies through space, expanding at nearly 31 miles per second (50 km/s). Yikes. 1445252605198931346_2523622912

Those words were written by a team of astronomers from Keio University in Japan to describe a strange, super fast cloud of molecules currently speeding through the Milky Way against the direction of the spin of our galaxy. The cloud measures over two light-years in size and is hurtling through the galaxy at speeds never observed in similar clouds of space dust. The cloud, nicknamed “the Bullet,” is traveling at speeds approaching 75 miles per second (120 km/s). The cloud is also stretching as it flies through space, expanding at nearly 31 miles per second (50 km/s). Yikes.

Share 4 55
 @99217 Instagram Profile Photo

99217

Check 99217's Instagram Last nights waxing gibbous, taken at 7:38pm. stay tuned for the full moon coming up on the 10th 1445182254456637148_2523622912

Last nights waxing gibbous, taken at 7:38pm. stay tuned for the full moon coming up on the 10th

Share 2 77
Load More